2015 Articles

2015 CenUSA Bioenergy Peer Reviewed Publications

  • Dang, Q., M.M. Wright & R.C. Brown. 2015. Ultra-low carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants through bio-oil co-firing and biochar sequestration. Environ. Sci. Technol. 49(24):14688-14695.
  • Feng, Q., I. Chaubey, G.Y. Her, R. Cibin, B. Engel, J.J. Volenec & X. Wang. 2015. Hydrologic and water quality impacts and biomass production potential on marginal land. Environ. Model. & Softw. 72:230-238.
  • Karlen, D.L., J.L. Kovar, S.J. Birrell. 2015. Corn Stover Nutrient Removal Estimates for Central Iowa, U.S.A. Sustainability 2015 7(7): 8621-8634. doi:10.3390/su7078621. (Open Access).
  • Koch, K., N. Palmer, M. Stamm, J. Bradshaw, E. Blankenship, L. Baird, G. Sarath & T. Heng-Moss. 2015. Characterization of Greenbug Feeding Behavior and Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Host Preference in Relation to Resistant and Susceptible Tetraploid Switchgrass Populations. Bioenerg. Res. 8:165-174. doi:10.1007/s12155-014-9510-0.
  • Lawrinenko, M. & D. A. Laird. 2015. Anion exchange capacity of biochar. Green Chem. 2015, 17 9: 4628 – 4636. doi: 10.1039/C5GC00828J.
  • Li, B., O. Longwen, Q. Dang, M. Pimphan, S. Jones, R.C. Brown & M.M. Wright. 2015. Techno-economic and uncertainty analysis of in situ and ex situ fast pyrolysis for biofuel production. Bioresour. Techn. 196:49-56.
  • Orr M. J., G. Bischoff, B. Applegate, J.J Volenec, S.M. Brouder & R.F. Turco. 2015. Transition to second generation cellulosic biofuel production systems reveals limited negative impacts on the soil microbial community structure. Appl. Soil Ecol. 95:62-72.
  • Porter, P., R.B. Mitchell & K.J. Moore. 2015. Reducing hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico: Reimagining a more resilient agricultural landscape in the Mississippi River watershed. J. Soil Water Conserv. 70(3):63A-68A. http://www.jswconline.org/content/70/3/63A.refs. (Open Access).
  • Ramstein, G.P., J. Evans S.M. Kaeppler, R.B. Mitchell, K.P. Vogel, C.R. Buell & M.D. Casler. 2015. Accuracy of genomic prediction in switchgrass improved by accounting for linkage disequilibrium. G3: Genes, Genomes, Genet. 6(4):1049-1062. doi: 10.1534/g3.115.024950. http://g3journal.org/content/6/4/1049.full. (Open Access).
  • Rogovska, N., D.A. Laird & D.L. Karlen. 2016. Corn and soil response to biochar application and stover harvest. Field Crops Res. 187:96-106.
  • Sharma, B., E. Brandes, A. Khanchi, S. Birrell, E. Heaton & F. E. Miguez. 2015. Evaluation of Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Cultivation Sites Using Geographic Information Systems: A Review. BioEnergy Res. 8(4):1714–1734.
  • Sindelar, A., M. , M. Gesch, F. Forcella, C. Eberle, M. Thom & D. Archer. 2015. Winter oilseed production for biofuel in the U.S. Corn Belt: Opportunities and limitations. GCB Bioenergy. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12297/full. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12297. (Open Access)
  • Stewart C.L., J.D. Pyle, K.P. Vogel, G.Y. Yuen & K.G. Scholthof. 2015. Multi-year pathogen survey of biofuel switchgrass breeding plots reveals high prevalence of infections by Panicum mosaic virus and its satellite virus. Phytopathology 105:1146-1154.
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